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Showrunner Camp – Schedule

Schedule – Are we really doing a two-hour show with real bands?

Schedule

Monday to Friday Daytime Schedule

  • 8:00 am          Studio opens (staff arrives)
  • 9:00 am          Camp opens (interns and crew members arrive) with craft service provided by group assigned
  • 9:30 am          Early Morning Class or Practice Slot
  • 10:30 am        Late Morning Class / Studio Apprentice Camp Broadcast
  • noon                Lunch provided by catering group assigned
  • 1:00 pm         Interns dismissed / Early Afternoon Class or Practice Slot
  • 2:00 pm         Late Afternoon Class or Practice Slot
  • 3:00 pm        Call for group assigned to Showrunner Camp Daily Broadcast
  • 3:30 pm          Go live for Showrunner Camp Daily Broadcast
  • 4:00 pm          Camp dismissed (studio remains open)
  • 5:00 pm          Studio closes (staff leaves), except Thursday and Friday

Thursday Evening Tech Rehearsal with Talent Schedule

  • 5:30 pm         Craft service  call
  • 6:00 pm         Tech crew call
  • 6:30 pm          Talent call
  • 9:00 pm          Dismissal

Friday Studio Apprentice Camp Broadcast Schedule

Interns are encouraged to invite family and friends to be members of studio audience and attend wrap party.

  • 1:30 pm         Craft service call
  • 2:00 pm        Crew call
  • 3:00 pm         Talent call
  • 3:30 pm         House opens
  • 3:45 pm          Warm-up studio audience
  • 4:00 pm         Go live
  • 5:00 pm         Wrap Party in Green Room

Friday Evening Broadcast Schedule

Crew members are encouraged to invite family and friends to be members of studio audience and attend wrap party.

  • 5:30 pm         Craft service call
  • 6:00 pm        Crew call
  • 6:30 pm         Talent call
  • 7:00 pm         House opens
  • 7:15 pm          Warm-up studio audience
  • 7:30 pm         Go live
  • 9:30 pm         Wrap Party in Green Room

 

Detailed Schedule

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

  • Staff Arrives and Studio Opens

    -

    Staff Arrives and Studio Opens

  • Craft Service and Catering

    -

    Instructor(s): Brad Perkins, Karen Lawfer, Clarice Bethers Craft service or craft services is the department in film, television and video production which provides cast and crew with snacks, drinks and other assistance. Craft service workers are nicknamed "crafties" because they provide their services to the other departments, known as crafts, in a set.  Other departments such as camera, sound, electricians, grips, props, art director, set decorator, special effects, hair and make-up, are referred to as crafts.  .  Craft service is different from catering; craft service refers to the food always available to the crew while they are working, while catering is provided by a catering company or a restaurant and handles full meals.  Typically there is one main table where the snacks and coffee are set up (which is simply called "crafty" or "the crafty table"). Occasionally there are two craft service stations, with one being for cast and crew and another for non-union background actors. A "satellite" crafty may be set up next to the camera, as they may not be able to leave their workstations. In addition to snacks and drinks, the craft service department clears the set of trash.  Aside from snacks and beverages, craft service may also supply bandages, aspirin, gum, antacids, toothpicks, hand sanitizer, sunscreen, and hand-warmers.  Crew member will get their AK Food Worker Card during the camp. Class Time: 1 Slot

  • Welcome, Introduction to Television Production, the Juneau Live! Studio, Daily Camp Broadcasts, Story-boarding, ENG

    -

    Instructor(s): April Dooley, Brad Perkins, Group Advisors

    Storyboarding

  • House and Greenroom Managing, Interfacing with Talent and Guest Services

    -

    Instructor(s): April Dooley, Pastor Karen Perkins, Brad Perkins, Karen Lawfer, tbd

    Finally, Resurrection Lutheran Church success in operating its community service programs (the CBJ Warming Shelter, the Juneau's largest Food Pantry and the Juneau Live! Studio) results partly from following our Guest Service Guidelines These guidelines are derived from the Disney Institute. Crew members will participate in an abbreviated version of this train that all RLC staff and volunteers complete.

  • Lunch

    -

    Lunch prepared by crew members catering.

  • Television Directing

    -

    nstructor(s): Paul McDermott, Jared Campbell, Brad Perkins

    Unlike the film counterpart, a director in television usually refers to the gallery (or control room) director, who is responsible for the creative look of a production through selecting which shots to use at any given moment. The director views the action on the studio floor through a bank of screens, each linked to one of the cameras, while issuing instructions down to the floor manager. They also control the gallery area, calling for sound rolls, digital on-screen graphics and video rolls. Some directors also work more closely with on-camera talent and others also act as both producer and director.  A video control operator (typically credited as video control, and sometimes as a video engineer or video operator) controls the video console to regulate transmission of content—everything from test patterns to live and recorded telecasts. Video control operators view the action on set through video monitors and set switches and observe dials on the video console to control contrast, framing, brilliance, color balance, and the fidelity of the transmitted image. They monitor the program to ensure broadcast technical quality, and review the program to determine that the signal functions properly and is ready for transmission on schedule. Video control operators and video tape operators are used only in television productions recorded on video tape because of the growing use of broadcast automation with video servers.  The video tape operator (VT operator or VTR operator) cues and prepares video inserts into a program. A VT operator sets up and operates video tape equipment to record and play back the program, reads the program log to ascertain when to record the program, and when it airs. They also select sources, such as satellite or studio, for the program, and select the video recording equipment to use. They are heavily used in sports programming, and in all video taped productions, including television news programming, and sometimes sitcoms, if they are shot on video tape), they are also responsible for action replays and quickly editing highlights while a show is in progress. As the title suggests, video tape operators only work in video taped production. Although, VTR operator's still work on digital productions. It is a name that has just stuck to the playback operator. They can also be on set editors to give the director and director of photography the ability to see how what they shot cuts together. Class Time: 1 Slot

  • Sound Engineering, A1, A2 and Boom Operation

    -

    Instructor(s): Keith Giles of Alaska Music One, Bradley Perkins, tbd

    A1 is the primary audio engineer responsible for the technical design and operation of associated sound systems (e.g. mixers, microphones, intercom, IFB, RF equipment, PA/monitoring, music/sfx playback, multi-track recording, and more). Generally speaking, the A1 supervises all audio crew members during build, rehearsal, and show phases of any production. Ultimately, the A1 will have routed, recorded, and mixed all sound sources heard during the program broadcast.  The A2 helps get microphones or other audio devices to the right place or to the right person.  An audio assistant (A2) positions and interconnects audio devices, such as microphones and intercoms, from the television production truck to the venue. Typically, larger productions use two or more A2s.  The boom operator is part of the sound crew, and an assistant to the sound engineer or production sound mixer. The boom operator's main responsibility is microphone placement, sometimes using a "fishpole" with a microphone attached to the end—and sometimes using a "boom" (most often a "fisher boom"). The fisher boom is a piece of equipment that the operator stands on that lets him precisely control the microphone at a greater distance from the actors. They also place wireless microphones on actors when necessary. The boom operator strives to keep the microphone boom near the action, but away from the camera frame so it never appears onscreen. They work closely with the production sound mixer, or sound recordist, to record all sound while filming including background noises, dialogue, sound effects, and silence.

  • Floor Direction and Camera Operation

    -

    Instructor(s):  Adam Garner, David Brabaw, Karen Lawfer

    As the head member of the camera crew, the camera operator uses the camera as instructed by the Director. They ensure the required action is correctly filmed in the frame, and must react instinctively as the proceedings take place. If the camera operator is also a cinematographer, they also help establish the theme and appearance of the show. The cinematographer—or director of photography (DP)—regulates lighting for every scene, frames some shots, chooses lenses, decides on film stock, and strives to match the project's visual appearance to the director's vision. However, the cinematographer does not usually move the camera on the set, as this is usually the exclusive role of a camera operator.  The floor manager represents the director on the studio floor, and gives instructions and direction to crew, cast, and guests. It is closest to the role of an assistant director, as the job frequently entails barking orders to keep a production on schedule. The floor manager is always in direct contact with the director via talkback in the gallery. The floor manager also checks that the floor is clear and safe for the performance, checks that scenery and set pieces are ready, turns on appropriate lights, makes announcements to staff and audience, helps maintain quietness and order, calls cues, and prompts talents as required. They also provide cues, timing and other information to the presenters and talents.  An assistant floor manager (AFM) sets the stage, prompts contributors on the studio floor, and ensures that everyone knows their place in the script. This frees the floor manager for other duties. They often oversee a team of runners. Increasingly, assistant floor managers are asked to help design and prepare props, and help set and reset action on the studio floor.

  • Showrunner Camp Daily Broadcasts

    -

    Prep Time for Daily Broadcasts

  • Showrunner Camp Daily Broadcasts

    -

    These daily br0adcasts serve a number of goals: opportunity to practice skills being learned in camp learning to work in a team setting preparing for a live broadcast going live on the studio’s announced schedule (3:30 each day of camp) to the public working in front of a studio audience (at least other groups, but could be anyone who shows up, if broadcasting from studio) or public (if broadcasting from outside studio) Crew members from other groups may act as talent for other groups’ broadcasts.  Check out the latest broadcast:

  • Studio Closes and Staff Leaves

    -

    Studio Closes and Staff Leaves

Wednesday

  • Staff Arrives and Studio Opens

    -

    Staff Arrives and Studio Opens

  • Stage Managing, Gripping and Gaffing

    -

    Instructor(s): April Dooley, David Brabaw, Clarice Bethers, tbd Stage managers organize and coordinate theatrical productions. The job encompasses a variety of activities, including organizing the production and coordinating communications between various personnel (e.g., between director and backstage crew, or actors and production management). Stage management is a sub-discipline of stagecraft.  The gaffer is the head electrician at the production set, and is in charge of lighting the stage under direction of the Cinematographer. In television, the term chief lighting director is often used instead of gaffer, and sometimes the technical director lights the set. The gaffer reports to the director of photography, lighting director. or lighting designer, and usually has an assistant called a best boy. In the U.S. and Canada, grips are lighting and rigging technicians in the film and video industries. They constitute their own department on a film set and are directed by a key grip. Grips have two main functions. The first is to work closely with the camera department to provide camera support, especially if the camera is mounted to a dolly, crane, or in an unusual position, such as the top of a ladder. Some grips may specialize in operating camera dollies or camera cranes. The second main function of grips is to work closely with the electrical department to create lighting set-ups necessary for a shot under the direction of the director of photography.  The key grip is the head grip. Grips affect shadow effects with lights, and occasionally maneuver camera cranes, dollies, and platforms under direction from the Cinematographer. The term grip is used in slightly different ways in American and British or Australian film making. In the British and Australian film industries, a grip mounts and supports cameras, which can include anything beyond a basic tripod. Lighting in British and Australian film-making is headed by the gaffer, who is also part of the camera department. Grips can also be the people that do the laborious work on sets. These type of grips push, pull, roll, and lift various pieces of equipment under direction from a television director, television producer, or set designer. In cinematography, the dolly grip places and moves the dolly track where required, and then pushes and pulls the dolly along that track during filming. A dolly grip works closely with the camera crew to perfect these complex movements through rehearsals. For moving shots, dolly grips may also push the wheeled platform that holds the microphone and Boom Operator. The dolly is a cart that the tripod and camera (and occasionally the camera crew) rest on. It transports the camera without bumps and visual interruptions throughout a shot. It is commonly used to follow beside an actor to give the audience the sense of walking with the actor, or as the actor. Class Time: 1 Slot

  • Lunch

    -

    Lunch prepared by crew members catering.

  • Floor Direction and Camera Operation

    -

    Instructor(s):  Adam Garner, David Brabaw, Karen Lawfer

    As the head member of the camera crew, the camera operator uses the camera as instructed by the Director. They ensure the required action is correctly filmed in the frame, and must react instinctively as the proceedings take place. If the camera operator is also a cinematographer, they also help establish the theme and appearance of the show. The cinematographer—or director of photography (DP)—regulates lighting for every scene, frames some shots, chooses lenses, decides on film stock, and strives to match the project's visual appearance to the director's vision. However, the cinematographer does not usually move the camera on the set, as this is usually the exclusive role of a camera operator.  The floor manager represents the director on the studio floor, and gives instructions and direction to crew, cast, and guests. It is closest to the role of an assistant director, as the job frequently entails barking orders to keep a production on schedule. The floor manager is always in direct contact with the director via talkback in the gallery. The floor manager also checks that the floor is clear and safe for the performance, checks that scenery and set pieces are ready, turns on appropriate lights, makes announcements to staff and audience, helps maintain quietness and order, calls cues, and prompts talents as required. They also provide cues, timing and other information to the presenters and talents.  An assistant floor manager (AFM) sets the stage, prompts contributors on the studio floor, and ensures that everyone knows their place in the script. This frees the floor manager for other duties. They often oversee a team of runners. Increasingly, assistant floor managers are asked to help design and prepare props, and help set and reset action on the studio floor.

  • Showrunner Camp Daily Broadcasts

    -

    Prep time for daily broadcast

  • Showrunner Camp Daily Broadcasts

    -

    These daily br0adcasts serve a number of goals: opportunity to practice skills being learned in camp learning to work in a team setting preparing for a live broadcast going live on the studio’s announced schedule (3:30 each day of camp) to the public working in front of a studio audience (at least other groups, but could be anyone who shows up, if broadcasting from studio) or public (if broadcasting from outside studio) Crew members from other groups may act as talent for other groups’ broadcasts.  Check out the latest broadcast:

  • Studio Closes and Staff Leaves

    -

    Studio Closes and Staff Leaves

Thursday

  • Staff Arrives and Studio Opens

    -

    Staff Arrives and Studio Opens

  • Producing and Showrunning

    -

    Instructor(s): Brad Perkins, tbd In the entertainment industry, a television producer (compare to film producer) is generally in charge of, or helps coordinate, the financial, legal, administrative, technological, and artistic aspects of a production.  The Showrunner is the person who has overall creative authority and management responsibility for a television program. “the vision of the show as a whole does not come from the freelance or even the staff writer, but from the showrunner.

  • Sound Engineering, A1, A2 and Boom Operation

    -

    Instructor(s): Keith Giles of Alaska Music One, Bradley Perkins, tbd

    A1 is the primary audio engineer responsible for the technical design and operation of associated sound systems (e.g. mixers, microphones, intercom, IFB, RF equipment, PA/monitoring, music/sfx playback, multi-track recording, and more). Generally speaking, the A1 supervises all audio crew members during build, rehearsal, and show phases of any production. Ultimately, the A1 will have routed, recorded, and mixed all sound sources heard during the program broadcast.  The A2 helps get microphones or other audio devices to the right place or to the right person.  An audio assistant (A2) positions and interconnects audio devices, such as microphones and intercoms, from the television production truck to the venue. Typically, larger productions use two or more A2s.  The boom operator is part of the sound crew, and an assistant to the sound engineer or production sound mixer. The boom operator's main responsibility is microphone placement, sometimes using a "fishpole" with a microphone attached to the end—and sometimes using a "boom" (most often a "fisher boom"). The fisher boom is a piece of equipment that the operator stands on that lets him precisely control the microphone at a greater distance from the actors. They also place wireless microphones on actors when necessary. The boom operator strives to keep the microphone boom near the action, but away from the camera frame so it never appears onscreen. They work closely with the production sound mixer, or sound recordist, to record all sound while filming including background noises, dialogue, sound effects, and silence. Class Time: 2 Slots

  • Lighting and Set Design and Hair, Makeup and Wardrobe

    -

    Instructor(s): Pastor Karen Perkins, Tamara Walter, Karen Lawfer, April Dooleyr

    The production designer is responsible for the production's visual appearance.They design, plan, organize, and arrange set design, equipment availability, and control a production's on-screen appearance. The production designer is often called the set designer, or scenic designer. They are trained professionals, often with Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degrees in scenic design. The set designer collaborates with the theater director to create an environment for the production—and communicates details of this environment to the technical director, charge scenic artist and property master. Scenic designers create drawings and scale models of the scenery. The set designer also takes instructions from the art director to create the appearance of the stage, and design its technical assembly. The art director, who may also be the production designer, plans and oversees the formation of settings for a project. They must be well versed in art and design styles, including architecture and interior design. They also work with the Cinematographer to accomplish the precise appearance for the project. The scenic designer collaborates with the theatre director and other members of the production design team to create an environment for the production, and then communicates details of this environment to the technical director, production manager, charge artist, and property master. Scenic designers.  A professional make-up artist is usually a cosmetology beautician, and applies makeup to anyone who appears on screen. They concentrate on the area above the chest, the face, the top of the head, the fingers, hands, arms, and elbows. Their role is to manipulate the actor's on-screen appearance to make them look younger, older, larger,etc. Body make-up artists concentrate on the body rather than the head. Make-up itself is substances to enhance the beauty of the human body, but can also change the appearance, disguise, or costume someone. Make-up artists, hair stylists, costume designers, and dress technicians combine their efforts to transform actors into characters, presenters, etc.  The costume designer makes all the clothing and costumes worn by all the Actors on screen, as well as designing, planning, and organizing the construction of the garments down to the fabric, colours, and sizes. They greatly contribute to the appearance of the production, and set a particular mood, time, feeling, or genre. They alter the overall appearance of a project with their designs and constructions, including impacting on the style of the project, and how the audience interprets the show's characters. etc. Class Time: 2 Slots

  • Lighting and Set Design and Hair, Makeup and Wardrobe

    -

    Instructor(s): Pastor Karen Perkins, Clarice Bethers, Karen Lawfer, April Dooley

    The production designer is responsible for the production’s visual appearance.They design, plan, organize, and arrange set design, equipment availability, and control a production’s on-screen appearance. The production designer is often called the set designer, or scenic designer. They are trained professionals, often with Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degrees in scenic design. The set designer collaborates with the theater director to create an environment for the production—and communicates details of this environment to the technical director, charge scenic artist and property master. Scenic designers create drawings and scale models of the scenery. The set designer also takes instructions from the art director to create the appearance of the stage, and design its technical assembly. The art director, who may also be the production designer, plans and oversees the formation of settings for a project. They must be well versed in art and design styles, including architecture and interior design. They also work with the Cinematographer to accomplish the precise appearance for the project. The scenic designer collaborates with the theatre director and other members of the production design team to create an environment for the production, and then communicates details of this environment to the technical director, production manager, charge artist, and property master. Scenic designers.  A professional make-up artist is usually a cosmetology beautician, and applies makeup to anyone who appears on screen. They concentrate on the area above the chest, the face, the top of the head, the fingers, hands, arms, and elbows. Their role is to manipulate the actor’s on-screen appearance to make them look younger, older, larger,etc. Body make-up artists concentrate on the body rather than the head. Make-up itself is substances to enhance the beauty of the human body, but can also change the appearance, disguise, or costume someone. Make-up artists, hair stylists, costume designers, and dress technicians combine their efforts to transform actors into characters, presenters, etc.  The costume designer makes all the clothing and costumes worn by all the Actors on screen, as well as designing, planning, and organizing the construction of the garments down to the fabric, colours, and sizes. They greatly contribute to the appearance of the production, and set a particular mood, time, feeling, or genre. They alter the overall appearance of a project with their designs and constructions, including impacting on the style of the project, and how the audience interprets the show’s characters. etc.

  • Lunch

    -

    Lunch prepared by crew members catering.

  • Television Directing

    -

    nstructor(s): Paul McDermott, Jared Campbell, Brad Perkins

    Instructor(s): Paul McDermott, Jared Campbell, Brad Perkins Unlike the film counterpart, a director in television usually refers to the gallery (or control room) director, who is responsible for the creative look of a production through selecting which shots to use at any given moment. The director views the action on the studio floor through a bank of screens, each linked to one of the cameras, while issuing instructions down to the floor manager. They also control the gallery area, calling for sound rolls, digital on-screen graphics and video rolls. Some directors also work more closely with on-camera talent and others also act as both producer and director.  A video control operator (typically credited as video control, and sometimes as a video engineer or video operator) controls the video console to regulate transmission of content—everything from test patterns to live and recorded telecasts. Video control operators view the action on set through video monitors and set switches and observe dials on the video console to control contrast, framing, brilliance, color balance, and the fidelity of the transmitted image. They monitor the program to ensure broadcast technical quality, and review the program to determine that the signal functions properly and is ready for transmission on schedule. Video control operators and video tape operators are used only in television productions recorded on video tape because of the growing use of broadcast automation with video servers.  The video tape operator (VT operator or VTR operator) cues and prepares video inserts into a program. A VT operator sets up and operates video tape equipment to record and play back the program, reads the program log to ascertain when to record the program, and when it airs. They also select sources, such as satellite or studio, for the program, and select the video recording equipment to use. They are heavily used in sports programming, and in all video taped productions, including television news programming, and sometimes sitcoms, if they are shot on video tape), they are also responsible for action replays and quickly editing highlights while a show is in progress. As the title suggests, video tape operators only work in video taped production. Although, VTR operator's still work on digital productions. It is a name that has just stuck to the playback operator. They can also be on set editors to give the director and director of photography the ability to see how what they shot cuts together. Class Time: 1 Slot

  • Showrunner Camp Daily Broadcasts

    -

    Prep time for daily broadcast

  • Showrunner Camp Daily Broadcasts

    -

    These daily br0adcasts serve a number of goals: opportunity to practice skills being learned in camp learning to work in a team setting preparing for a live broadcast going live on the studio’s announced schedule (3:30 each day of camp) to the public working in front of a studio audience (at least other groups, but could be anyone who shows up, if broadcasting from studio) or public (if broadcasting from outside studio) Crew members from other groups may act as talent for other groups’ broadcasts.  Check out the latest broadcast:

  • Thursday Evening Tech Rehearsal with Talent Schedule

    -

    Craft service  call

  • Thursday Evening Tech Rehearsal with Talent Schedule

    -

    Tech crew call

  • Thursday Evening Tech Rehearsal with Talent Schedule

    -

    Talent call

  • Studio Closes and Staff Leaves

    -

    Studio Closes and Staff Leaves

  • Thursday Evening Tech Rehearsal with Talent Schedule

    -

    Dismissal

Friday

  • Staff Arrives and Studio Opens

    -

    Staff Arrives and Studio Opens

  • House and Greenroom Managing, Interfacing with Talent and Guest Services

    -

    Instructor(s): April Dooley, Pastor Karen Perkins, Brad Perkins, Karen Lawfer, tbd

    House management concerns the selling of tickets, the ushering of patrons in front of house areas, and the maintenance and management of the theatre building. House management staff usually work for the theatre, under the supervision of the house manager, and not for the theatrical troupe which is occupying it. Often in regional or smaller theatres the responsibility falls under the aegis of the marketing department or patron services. In any case, house management works closely with the production management team for the presentation of the theatrical production.  The greenroom is the space in a theater or similar venue that functions as a waiting room and lounge for performers before, during, and after a performance or show when they are not engaged on stage. Green rooms typically have seating for the performers, such as upholstered chairs and sofas.  The origin of the term is often ascribed to such rooms historically being painted green.  Modern green rooms need not necessarily adhere to a specifically green color scheme, though the theatrical tradition of the name remains.  Some English theatres contained several green rooms, each ranked according to the status, fame, and salary of the actor: one could be fined for using a green room above one's station.  Working with and supporting talent (performers) and there entourage is an art in itself, and will be covered.  Finally, Resurrection Lutheran Church success in operating its community service programs (the CBJ Warming Shelter, the Juneau's largest Food Pantry and the Juneau Live! Studio) results partly from following our Guest Service Guidelines  These guidelines are derived from the Disney Institute.  Crew members will participate in an abbreviated version of this train that all RLC staff and volunteers complete. Class Time: 3 Slots

  • Lunch

    -

    Lunch prepared by crew members catering.

  • Clearance Administration and IP Rights

    -

    Instructor(s): Brad Perkins Reviews outlines, designs, scripts & storyboards to ensure that names, places, businesses, etc., do not infringe the rights of third parties or are otherwise clear to use. Confirms facts by checking information sources and reviewing third party clearance reports.  Reviews animatics and rough animation to verify required changes have been made and to check if any further clearances are required.  Discusses results and questions with executives and production personnel.  Obtains permission for use of any third-party trademarks/copyrights and other third-party materials for use in WBA's programs. Analyzes all content for possible infringements. Class Time: 1/2 Slot

  • Careers in Television, Opportunities in Juneau and Camp Wrap-up

    -

    Instructor(s): Brad Perkins, tbd, staff

    Instructor(s): Brad Perkins, tbd, staff Various careers in television and opportunities to practice skills learned in camp will be discussed, including internships at the studio and intern-staff positions for future camps..  Crew members have right to use the studio in the future (contact Brad to arrange).  Finally, there will be a camp wrap-up for feedback and written feedback forms forms will be distributed.  Wrap party for camp follows the Friday night broadcast. Class Time: 1/2 Slot

  • Showrunner Camp Daily Broadcasts

    -

    Prep time for daily broadcast

  • Showrunner Camp Daily Broadcasts

    -

    These daily br0adcasts serve a number of goals: opportunity to practice skills being learned in camp learning to work in a team setting preparing for a live broadcast going live on the studio’s announced schedule (3:30 each day of camp) to the public working in front of a studio audience (at least other groups, but could be anyone who shows up, if broadcasting from studio) or public (if broadcasting from outside studio) Crew members from other groups may act as talent for other groups’ broadcasts.  Check out the latest broadcast:

  • Friday Evening Broadcast Schedule

    -

    Craft service call

  • Friday Evening Broadcast Schedule

    -

    Crew call

  • Friday Evening Broadcast Schedule

    -

    Talent call

  • Friday Evening Broadcast Schedule

    -

    House opens

  • Friday Evening Broadcast Schedule

    -

    Warm-up studio audience

  • Friday Evening Broadcast Schedule

    -

    Go live

  • Friday Evening Broadcast Schedule

    -

    Wrap Party in Green Room

  • Studio Closes and Staff Leaves

    -

    Studio Closes and Staff Leaves